Direct Injection, It’s Here to Stay : The Lion's Den University
Class Notes - 02/20/17

02/20/17 - Class Notes

This class we are going to be discussing multiple things from the textbook. Re-read some of the sections you discussed later to make sure you understand all of it. In order to get back to the site once the teacher goes away, simply hit the close button at the top right next to comments and share. If you are the teacher and reading this, cut the kid a break - if your class was more interesting this would have never happened in the first place.

There are several things that can

Direct Injection, It’s Here to Stay

cheap_speed_08_211_cd_galleryGas prices are going up, and as a result, consumers are seeking vehicles with improved fuel economy. Also, environmental concerns and emissions laws pressure manufacturers to make a product that produces fewer emissions. With that being said, consumers are still looking for more power. This is a big problem for the automotive industry. Typically, more power equals poorer fuel economy and higher emissions. So, what’s the answer? Direct injection.

Here’s how it works. Fuel is injected at high pressure directly into the combustion chamber, instead of mixing with air in the intake or cylinder port.  The gains in power and efficiency come from precise control over the amount of fuel being delivered. Also, engines using direct injection are able to run at higher compression, which further improves its’ power characteristics.

direct-fuel-injection-inline-1

Direct injection was actually first used in the 1955 Mercedes Benz 300 SL, but didn’t really become popular until roughly ten years ago. When it was first used, its’ electronic controls were costly and unreliable. But, technology has come a long way, and now it’s found in many new vehicles, even economy cars.

The use of direct injection has allowed auto manufacturers to achieve more power, improved fuel economy, and to create fewer emissions. This certainly is a win-win for the consumer and manufacturer.

Darryl

Photos courtesy of Car and Driver magazine

Direct injection was actually first used in the 1955 Mercedes Benz 300 SL, but didn’t really become popular until roughly ten years ago. When it was first used, its’ electronic controls were costly and unreliable. But, technology has come a long way, and now it’s found in many new vehicles, even economy cars.

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